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Kodak Ektar Film 120 Colour ISO 100 5-pack

Our Price: £32.00 GBP

100123

Description

A fantastic professional 120 film for nature, wildlife and fashion thanks to it's vivid colours and optimised sharpness. It also promises the "World's Finest Grain"! This also makes it a wonderful holiday film, ensuring you come back with photos that burst with medium-format life.

 

Specification

Format: 120
Colour: Colour
Type: Negative
ISO: 100
Exposures: 12
Pack size: 5

 

To understand more about the details above you can check out our film guide or if you want some inspiration then head over to our page on choosing your next film. And if you want the full details about the film, including technical information, read about Kodak Ektar over on EMULSIVE.

 

Kodak - properly known as Kodak Eastman - was founded in America in 1888 and dominated the "Western" world of photography for the next 100 years, constantly in fierce rivalry with the Japanese Fuji. Similarly to Fuji the advent of digital photography at the turn of the century caused significant financial problems. A late attempt to win in the compact market was hit by the rise of mobile photography and bankruptcy followed in 2012. Fortunately the photography business has survived under the Kodak Alaris name - based in Hertfordshire, England - and they have delighted the analogue industry by pledging continued support for film production and the promise of bringing back old favourite emulsions.

For more information about the brand check out our bio of Kodak

Sample shots (c) Sam Stockman

 

Where we ship

When you buy your camera film from us we can ship it across the UK, Europe, USA, New Zealand, Australia and Canada (more countries planned soon!) So buy your Kodak Ektar Film 120 Colour ISO 100 5-pack today and dive back into the fun of 120 film photography!

Customer Reviews

Based on 9 reviews
78%
(7)
22%
(2)
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R
R.S.
Perfect for: Landscapes, Architecture, Creative/Abstract, Travel
High-saturation with latitude

This is an excellent film for non-human subjects, provided you're able to give it a decent amount of sunlight. If it's overcast, I find the colours tend to get a bit muddier and (much as it over-emphasises the brightness of a sunny day a little bit), it can make things look really gloomy. It can be a bit tricky to get colour balance right when scanning, but once you get your eye in the results are definitely worth the effort. Probably my second-favourite colour stock to put in my Pentax 67.

A
A.
Perfect for: Portraits, Landscapes, Architecture, Creative/Abstract, Travel, Studio work
Super saturated but not overblown colours. Invisible grain

This is one special film. Kodak have cooked up a highly saturated colour film but which still exhibits balanced colours (unlike Gold which I find makes everything look brown). Sunny days were made for Ektar, it brings out blue skies, colourful flowers, landscapes etc. You do need to be a little careful not to over-expose especially when photographing caucasian people.

M
M.
Perfect for: Landscapes, Architecture, Travel, Studio work, Low light/Night
C O L O U R S

The 'world's finest grain' and great saturation, this is one of my favourite medium format films. I keep considering shooting slide film then just revert back to this instead; as a colour negative film it's slightly more forgiving in terms of exposure latitude. Watch out for paler skin tones turning reddish when shooting at box. Also try rating it at 400 or more then push in dev if your lab will do it.

O
O.C.
Perfect for: Landscapes
Good Landscape Film

I have used this film for landscapes in the past. It has very fine grain and soft tones which are very pleasing. However, the colours never quite deliver in my opinion and take a bit of work in post processing (either lab or digital) to get right.

C
C.H.
Perfect for: Great All-Rounder, Landscapes, Street Photography, Travel
Not the most realistic, but an instant classic.

Ektar is a name that people affiliate with bright, bold colours, good contrast and wonky skin tones. I've been shooting this film since day one, and it never disappoints. I have shot portraits, landscapes, street and more with this stock, whenever I have enough light and colours worth capturing, Ektar is one of the first stocks that come to mind. It's especially vibrant, although I find the rendering of certain colours isn't particularly accurate; although I must clarify this isn't necessarily a bad thing. I've attached a few shots from a recent trip to Copenhagen, including some of a few fairly iconic buildings. For what it's worth, i've never had an issue with capturing skin tones on this film, some feel they are slightly red but this has never been significant enough to be a problem in my experience. Portra is probably better in this case, but less so for capturing vibrant colours with minimal grain.

IG: @adventureswithfilm