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Lomographie Berlin 400 - 120 Film

Price:£9.50 GBP
Now: £9.00 GBP

100405

Beschreibung

120 Berlin ist ein B & amp; W film: von einer Rolle der deutschen cine Lager speziell für Lomography extrahierte und in den Legenden des 1960er Jahre Neuen Deutschen Films durchtränkt. Eine panchromatische Emulsion mit einer ISO-Bewertung von 400, die jedoch auf 800, 1600 oder 3200 erhöht werden kann, wobei ein beeindruckender Detaillierungsgrad erhalten bleibt. Kraftvoll, bezaubernd und mit einer Formulierung von 2019 aktualisiert.

Mit dem flexiblen und atmosphärischen film Berlin 120 können Sie selbst zeitlose und filmische Bilder erstellen.

Spezifikationen

Format: 120
Farbe: B & amp; W.
Art: Negativ
ISO: 400
Expositionen: 12
Paket Größe: 1

 

Um mehr über die obigen Details zu erfahren, können SieBesuche unsere film oder wenn Sie sich inspirieren lassen möchten, besuchen Sie unsere Seite unterwähle deinen nächsten film.

 

Die Lomographie steht seit Jahrzehnten an der Spitze der analogen Revolution. Ab 1992 verliebten sich einige Wiener Studenten in die Ästhetik einer bestimmten sowjetischen Kamera, der legendären LC-A. Sie gründeten eine Bewegung und eine Firma, die eine neue Generation in die Freuden von Plastikkameras und experimentellen film einführen sollte. In regelmäßigen Abständen neue Kameras für vorhandene Formate innovieren - und manchmal Formate speziell für ihre Kameras zurückbringen! - Sie sind lebendig und kreativve

Weitere Informationen zu den verschiedenen Lomography-Kinofilmen finden Sie dannKaufen Sie die gesamte Kollektion ein oderLesen Sie unseren Artikel die Unterschiede erklären.

 

Wohin wir versenden

Wenn Sie Ihre Kamera film von uns kaufen , können wir es in Großbritannien, Europa, USA, Neuseeland, Australien und Kanada weiteren Ländern geplant bald versandt! Kaufen Sie noch heute Ihren Lomography Berlin Kino Film 120 und tauchen Sie ein in den Spaß der mittelformatigen Lomography - Filmfotografie!y!

Customer Reviews

Based on 4 reviews
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J
J.C.
Sharing with the Film Community: Yes
Accreditation Handles: @jackcroftsdigitalportfolio
A fine film

Short but sweet review from me today. The film base is quite dark which results in muddy shadows and highlights when compared to Ilford and Kodak black and white films. I developed my role in D-76 in stock and found when scanning the negatives that the files were a bit flat and had to be pushed to get a contrast that I like. The only way I can describe it is all. mids and little shadows and highlights. Personally, I would prefer to shoot either a Kentmere or Foma film as they are about half the cost and I prefer the look of those stocks.

The film is fine I know some people will dig this film, unfortunately, it's just not for me.

G
G.c.
Perfect for: Great All-Rounder
Sharing with the Film Community: Yes
Accreditation Handles: Gavin collins
A great all round film

This is the first time I have used this 120 film and was keen to give it a try I am happy with the film although the weather was pretty rubbish which left the negatives with a low contrast but I have a roll of 35mm which I will use when the weather is good I developed it in xtol with the same time as for the 35mm as no time was stated for 120mm on the massive dev chart. The picture is only a quick scan on my phone.

N
N.H.
Perfect for: Great All-Rounder, Beginners, Portraits, Landscapes, Street Photography, Travel
Moody medium fast cinematic film

The first time I tried this film, I wrecked it with a stupid mistake in developing. This time, I sent it to AG photo for processing, not so much because I was afraid to develop it myself, but more because I have been too busy to do my own processing.

On a recent trip to Dunkeld, I dropped a roll in my little old Afga Isolette, a ridiculously cheap camera -- most of the film I put through it costs more than the camera did. The camera has no meter or gadgets to tell you where to set the dials, so you have no choice but to figure it out according to the light and the film speed, and what you’re trying to achieve. I have ditched the neurotic habit of writing down every exposure setting of every frame. Consequently, I’ve enjoyed my photography more, although I am less certain of good results.

I am pleased with how moody this film is -- the autumnal feeling of a rainy weekend in the Hermitage Forest is certainly preserved in these images. I scanned the negatives on an Epson and made a couple of contrast adjustments in these examples, and added some split toning in the cropped one. I will be back for more of this stock.

J
J.
Perfect for: Portraits, Street Photography, Creative/Abstract
Great cinematic retro look - annoying to develop at home

This is a difficult film to review: the end results are pleasant and under the right conditions, the film shows wonderful potential with a lovely grain structure and a fantastic cinematic look.

Unfortunately, however, to get there, one needs to be very patient and resilient (or send it to a lab). I have been developing my own film for quite a while. So far, this one has been the most troublesome. Loading it on plastic reels is difficult and frustrating as it tends to twist and turn a lot. I also found that it needs longer fixing than other emulsions. Despite using wetting agent as normal, the film developed drying marks. The biggest surprise was the heavy curling which made the negatives impossible to scan at first (flattening the strips under a stack of books worked well). The film has a dark film base which might limit the tonal range. Of course it is perfectly possible that I just got unlucky with the two rolls I shot and developed so far.

Once dry and flat, the negatives look fine. If you are used to the classic 400 emulsions, don't be discouraged by the dark, yet thin film base; the negatives still scan nicely. That being said, the film definitely has less latitude and flexibility than HP5 or Tri-X and needs good light to shine. But if you find that golden hour sweet spot, the images come out looking great displaying a strong cinematic nostalgia and lovely cubic grain. The sample photo below was shot during golden hour and with a yellow filter attached to the lens (developed in Rodinal 1:50 for 13 min at 20°C; exposed at EI400 with adjustments for filters). The negatives without yellow/orange filters tend to look a bit too flat for my taste.

Despite the pleasant results and the cinematic look, it did not win me over. HP5 and Tri-X are more flexible emulsions, easier to develop, virtually indistructable, and deliver great, contrasty results in almost all lighting conditions. I would give the film 3.5 stars - but in absence of half stars, I will have to award 3 stars.